Socrates in the Ancient Agora I

Welcome Price

€12

Duration

1 1/2 Hours

Starts

Jun 30

Socrates in the Ancient  Agora I

Instructor

Dr Anthi Dipla

Anthi Dipla is a Classical archaeologist/art historian who has graduated from Oxford University (MA, PhD). She has participated in excavations, scientific projects and conferences in Greece, Cyprus and abroad. Her research has been focused on Greek vase painting, iconography, and mythology, with further interests in women studies, social history, ancient Greek theatre, and cultural exchange in the ancient Mediterranean world, and has been published extensively in international peer-reviewed periodicals and books. As an adjunct professor she has affiliated herself to various universities in Greece and abroad, including the UK and the USA, and she currently teaches at the Hellenic Open University and the Open University of Cyprus. As a tour guide, she has joined various Greek and foreign tour operators, specializing in VIP clients.

About the tour

The ancient agoras, typical to any Ancient Greek city, were by definition a place of gather and exchange, either of material goods or just of ideas. As a keen “word merchant”, who advocated that only an examined life was worth living, Socrates spent the best part of his life in the Agora of Athens, where the civic, political, and commercial heart of the city beat.

Based on various ancient authors, such as Plato, Aristophanes or Xenophon, we will try to stage various episodes of the philosopher’s life among the surviving ruins of the Athenian Agora. Socrates seems to have left his most distinct footprints in the colonnaded porticoes, the stoas, framing the Agora and serving as offices, law courts, exhibition rooms, shops, or just as venues for casual meetings. Practicing an exclusively oral philosophy, Socrates was always seeking for prospective students in those much-frequented places. Moreover, Socrates held many of his philosophical discussions in the open square of the Agora near the benches set up by casual merchants, or bankers, in shops and in houses surrounding the Agora, during private banquets. Meanwhile, Socrates will also lead us along the administrative buildings lining the west side of the Agora. Though not eager to participate in public affairs, Socrates was once allotted in the Senate of 500 and served his office with unconditional respect for the Athenian law.

How it Works

This tour has been designed for virtual presentation. This is a group that accommodates up to 100 participants at a time.Once you book this experience, we will send you a confirmation email with a link to join the session. You can access the tour via the link provided.

What you need

In order to stream the session, you need a stable internet connection and a desktop, laptop or mobile device.